Wayne Dyer Daily Affirmations

Bruce Lipton, a world famous doctor, educator and author is often quoted by his supporters as an icon of self-help and physical fitness. Born in 1906, Bruce Lipton obtained his medical degree from Harvard University and worked for the U.S. Public Health Service for over twenty years. He’s famous for his studies into the human mind and the universe of human consciousness.

In his book The Biology of Belief: Research on the Changing Self, Bruce Lipton shows how our thought processes are linked to the physical body. In this book he explores how belief can control and shape our conscious information processing and our behavior patterns. To understand how this works you need to look at how we think and why. According to Bruce Lipton, when we think, our brains release chemicals called neurotransmitters, which flow through pathways in our brains. These neurotransmitters are responsible for coordinating all our thinking, communication and physiological functions.

Our thoughts, emotions, memories, skills, wisdom and creativity are produced with these neurotransmitters. But it’s important to realize that our thinking is not solely a function of our brain. Our entire body, including our thoughts and unconscious mind also affects our thinking. Weaker believing can manifest in many different ways, from poor concentration and problem solving to cranky, anxious and angry.

Because our conscious mind does not always control our conscious information processing, sometimes we’re forced to rely on our subconscious mind for help. As an example, if we are solving a problem or developing new skills, we may start by using logic and rational thinking. However, as soon as we get caught to our own”logical puzzle” we revert to our emotional memory and behaviour patterns. And before we know it we are back at square one, with another problem and possibly another round of frustrated and angry response.

Bruce Lipton believes that the way we consider problem solving goes far beyond our intellectual capacities. Instead, he believes, our unconscious mind provides the critical information that guides and directs our behavior. And although this portion of our mind is far more difficult to influence than logic and reflection, it is also more resistant to negative manipulation. This means that we can change undesirable behavior patterns far more easily and effectively than we could with logic and rational thinking alone.

Bruce Lipton recommends using several problem solving techniques in addition to his classic ones. He says you must be ready to go beyond your comfort zone when solving complex problems, and he advocates using intuition as an additional tool. Intuition comes into play as it helps us connect what we know to our subconscious mind, which in turn helps us make connections to the unconscious mind. Another tool he proposes is to develop an inner filter to remove conscious information and focus all attention on the intuitive part of the brain. Because mindful information tends to limit our intuitive abilities, consciously processing too much information at once can have a severe inhibitory effect.

Bruce Lipton presents several practical steps to help people solve their own problems. These measures are based on his years of clinical practice and research. These steps are especially valuable for people who can’t afford or don’t want to spend money on counseling sessions. In fact, if you believe you need more help with problem solving, Bruce Lipton can often be a terrific source of support and inspiration.

Bruce Lipton’s problem solving techniques go beyond mere tips on how best to solve problems. Furthermore, he teaches that there are two parts to a problem; the physical problem and the emotional problem or concern. And he believes these two parts can be separated because the physical problem is simply a symptom of deeper psychological problems. . .so if you ignore the psychological problem, you won’t be dismissing the physical one .